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Using Leverage to Proactively Address and Manage Student Emotions From a Young Age

There is a range of complex reasons why students misbehave in class. But, sometimes, it has nothing to do with the class or lesson itself. Often times it also has nothing to do with you or your teaching methods. Unfortunately, students in disadvantaged areas are more likely to face stresses and troubles at home which, in turn, can negatively affect their academic performance. Whether it’s the added pressure of looking after a younger sibling or living in a household with only one parent, we don’t know what happens once our children leave school.

What we can do, however, is equip them with the skills they need to manage their emotions from a young age. This can lead to increased communication and higher academic achievement. Moreover, leveraging these tools doesn’t have to cost schools and educational institutions a fortune. Read on to find out more about how you can use leverage to proactively address and manage student emotions from a young age.

Teaching Kids More Than the Curriculum

Behavior management is essential if you want to maintain a level of order in your classroom. By managing behavior, you give your students the environment they need to learn, and in turn, succeed. But, what if none of the best practices you’ve learned actually work? What if the same student, or group of students, continues to disrupt your classroom?

In truth, disruptive behavior can be hard to control, especially when all the tricks you’ve got up your sleeve don’t work. But, it can also be a sign of something more deep-rooted. In a talk by the Principle of an Ohio school, Olympia Della Flora, she describes a situation whereby one particular child threw uncontrollable fits of rage that could put the school into complete lockdown mode.

So, how could she and her faculty manage this child’s behavior? And how could she stop it from impeding on other children’s learning?

While they didn’t come up with a fail-safe solution for the student in question, they did come up with an idea. They realized that in order for children with behavioral issues to thrive they not only needed to teach them to read and write but also help them to deal with and manage their own emotions.


Creating a partnership with local colleges and other groups gives you access to people who are studying or trained in not only school psychology and teaching but also social work. Leveraging these individuals and pairing them with teachers will allow you to help your most struggling students.

What Do Students Need to Better Manage Their Emotions

Here are some tips that can help you teach your children how to better manage their emotions:

1. Get to Know Your Students

When it comes to teaching students how to manage emotions, there is no one-size-fits-all solution. That said, the first step is to find out where the student is struggling most. By learning more about your students, you can find new strategies that can help calm them. Teachers should take time during the day to help students identify their emotions, offering them appropriate coping strategies for dealing with them.

2. Help Your Kids Transition Between Home and School

Additionally, it’s important to recognize the fact that it can be hard for young children to transition to school as they move from a less structured home environment to a school environment with rules, regulations, and schedules. It’s, therefore, essential to keep this transition in mind. A method to help them cope with this transition could be to give students a calming place where they can go away from the other kids in order to relax and unwind. Giving them this space first thing in the morning offers them more time to transition back into the school environment on their own terms.

3. Leverage Peer Influence and External Entities

Studies show that peer influence is extremely powerful. This is because students can better relate to one another. By leveraging student help, you’re offering help from a more relatable perspective. But, it’s also important to leverage different avenues from external entities, individuals, and institutions.

This is because many schools don’t have the support staff to address the chaos children are facing at home. Moreover, members of staff don’t have the training to address these situations directly. This is where leveraging local groups, agencies, and colleges with experience in these areas can aid you without having to spend a large part of your budget.

Creating a partnership with local colleges and other groups gives you access to people who are studying or trained in not only school psychology and teaching but also social work. Leveraging these individuals and pairing them with teachers will allow you to help your most struggling students. By doing so, teachers gain access to the highest level professionals and these professionals get real-world life experiences in the classroom.